GBFD September – Foliage Returns

With spring flowers stealing the spotlight, it’s nice to see some of the deciduous trees and shrubs leafing out early this year (the dry, sunny weather means they are about 3 weeks ahead of shedule).

The first leaves are fresh and perfect, and this year, after a very cold winter, I don’t have to contend with an onslaught of aphids keen to get a jump on sucking sap before the ladybugs arrive to feast on them 🙂

Here is a selection of some of the foliage that has opened in the last week or so:

Foliage

L:R Betula pendula ‘Dalecarlica’; Hydrangea quercifolia; Physocarpus opulifolius ‘Monlo’

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Clockwise, L:R Spiraea x bumalda ‘Goldflame’; Picea glauca v. albertiana ‘Conica’ & Santolina chamaecyparissus; Rosa ‘Climbing Iceberg’; Metasequoia glyptostroboides

Japanese Maples are particularly effortless in the upper Blue Mountains.

I was able to purchase a few bare-rooted, cut-leaf, weeping varieties at a very good price during winter…so I couldn’t resist.

Once these start to mature, they lend an amazing sculptural quality to a garden; especially one that is steeply sloping like mine. For now, they are just little sticks, but they will fill out over the next few years!

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L:R Acer palmatum dissectum ‘Ever Red’ ; Acer palmatum dissectum ‘Seiryu’; Acer palmatum dissectum ‘Orangeola’

Linking up with Christina at My Hesperides Garden. Do take a look at the foliage that has captured bloggers attention this month!

Happy Gardening 🙂

Autumn Scenes from around Town

Despite a week of storms which put paid to all of the early autumn leaves, it certainly hasn’t done any damage to the second wave of colour.

We have had a few nice days, so here are some more scenes from around town.

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The colour of this Japanese Maple is beyond amazing…it’s almost unbelievable!

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Across the street, a yellow Japanese Maple is equally stunning

More Japanese Maples and London Plane

More Japanese Maples and London Plane


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The first of the ornamental cherries (Prunus serrulata sp.)

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Prunus serrulata sp. and Pistacia chinensis


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Fraxinus angustifolia ‘Raywood’ (Claret Ash)

This Australian raised cultivar is highly variable (even though all of these trees are grafted) – sometimes a brilliant red just like above, sometimes beautiful, multiple colourings. These trees make a fantastic medium-sized tree in temperate climates:

Claret Ash

Fraxinus angustifolia ‘Raywood’

Claret Ash

Fraxinus angustifolia ‘Raywood’

Claret Ash

Fraxinus angustifolia ‘Raywood’


Tupelo

Nyssa sylvatica – (unusually all yellow)


Liquidambars are a commonly planted tree in Australia – they colour okay even in warm coastal locations like Sydney , but put them in a cooler climate and the results can be spectacular:

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Liquidambar

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Liquidambars

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Liquidambar

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Liquidambar

Liquidamber

Liquidambar

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Oak

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Oaks

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Standard Japanese Maples and stream in one of the local gardens – so charming

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Liquidambar & Japanese Maples

Happy Gardening 🙂