Early Autumn Scenes

Here in the Sydney region, autumn proper doesn’t really kick in until the last week of April/first week of May, but this year there is quite a bit of early colour (which started back in late January!).

Such early colouring doesn’t auger too well for the typically brilliant displays later on in the month, but the usual throngs of ‘leaf peepers‘ who make the short trip from Sydney won’t mind. This is an aerial shot of my town, showing the foliage typically associated with early May:

cropped_cover_shot

Sydney Leaf Peeper heaven. Image Courtesy of the Blue Mountains City Council ‘Have Your Say’ website

While it’s no ‘New England Fall’ scene, the town has a real sense of the changing of seasons that the native Eucalyptus trees don’t really convey.

So to take a break from the goings-on in my garden, here’s some random scenes from around town:

Autumn

L:R Fraxinus augustifolia, Quercus palustris & Carpinus betulus

Autumn

Carpinus betulus & Acer japonica

Autumn

Viburnum sp.(plicatum?)

Autumn

Fraxinus excelsior & Liquidamber

Autumn

Liquidamber styraciflua

Autumn

Malus ioensis ‘plena’

Autumn

Fraxinus excelsior ‘aurea’

Autumn

Prunus padus

Autumn

Quercus sp.

Autumn

Ulmus procera

Autumn

Liquidamber styraciflua

Autumn

Liquidamber styraciflua (butchered under powerlines)

Autumn

Acer saccharum ‘Green Mountain’ (thanks to theshrubqueen for ID).

Autumn

I don’t know which variety of maple this is, but it’s a beauty! Acer saccharum ‘Green Mountain’ (thanks to theshrubqueen for ID)

 

Autumn

Fraxinus excelsior ‘aurea’

Autumn

Prunus padus

Autumn

Nyssa sylvatica

Autumn

Quercus palustris

Autumn

Acer x freemanni ‘Jeffers Red’

Autumn

Populus deltoids

I hope you enjoyed this little walk around town (which celebrates my 100th post) and I hope you have a wonderful Easter!

Happy gardening 🙂

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45 thoughts on “Early Autumn Scenes

    • You might be right, although it’s leaf is a bit different from the one I planted in my yard, so it could be a different strain – but it is in colour very early and looks absolutely spectacular!

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      • That’s it!!!!! Dang – now I want one of those instead of the one I planted 🙂 Maybe I’ll just have to buy the neighbours yard so I’ve enough room for all the trees I want!

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      • The Green Mountain was supposed to be better for color and urban conditions – they weren’t in the Deep South. I think you may be better served with the straight species. You really need more land …and some of those Purple Norway Maples. One of my favorites was Sassafras for fall color. I was surprised to see Black Gums in Australia.

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      • I do covet the purple Norway maples. There is a columnar one I have my eye on that turns the most wonderful burnished copper tone….I actually have a black gum tree in a pot waiting to go in the ground (although it hasn’t really started to colour yet). They are reasonably common here – even doing OK in Sydney

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  1. Wow! What a tree-fest! The Ash is like an incredible golden cloud, and the Green Mountain maple is stunning too. Silly I know, but I keep marveling over that things are waking up here, while going dormant over where you are. I think I need to come up with some kind of lifestyle where I can live down where you are when the dog days of our summers come. I really dread the heat…

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  2. What gorgeous colour from the ash trees! The Acers are marvelous, all of them… But they won’t grow here, while there are some desert Fraxinus species that would. I wonder whether they will colour up like these though? It’s refreshing to see some real autumn colour just as things are warming up here 😉

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  3. Beautiful! The colors are so vibrant and the landscape so different from here. I’ve so enjoyed watching your garden bloom and progress during my cold winter. As long as this winter was, it’s hard to believe that the seasons have turned again already.

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    • I’m so pleased that spring has finally decided to show itself in the N.E. You guys certainly have had a tough time of it. But now I get to look at all the lovely N. Hemisphere gardens while mine goes to sleep 🙂

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    • It was one of the hardest thing to readjust to after living in the N Hemisphere for many years…always so odd to have easter in autumn and Christmas in summer!!!!!

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  4. It must be cold where you live to get that degree of gorgeous defoliation. Its just starting to rock the low C’s here in Northern Tasmania and our deciduous trees are starting to colour up nicely. Happy Easter 🙂

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      • You get snow? You are colder than us for sure! Launceston is colder than here and gets heavy frost and the mountains get snow but we rarely get a frost here but it has been cold early so you never know what this year will deliver. Happy Easter 🙂

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      • Happy easter! We get at least 6 snowfalls each year – and at least 2 will be heavy enough to close the highway from here all the way to Bathurst (about 100kms away). I am fairly lucky in this spot though, towns slightly west such as Oberon and Orange can get snowed in for a week at a time. At least it is usually melted here within a day or so 🙂

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  5. Spectacular colour on those trees, the maples are my favourite for autumn hues. Many congratulations on the 100th post too. I’m enjoying learning about the range of Southern Hemisphere plants and discovering that there are so many that we have in common too.

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    • Thanks! My little pocket of Australia has a very English-style climate with cool summers and lots of rain and 80 or so frost days per annum so I can indulge my passion of growing so many different types of plants from all over the globe!

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    • Thanks! I’ve lots of US plants in my collection already, but for crabapples in the cooler parts of Australia, nothing beats the one from the prairies as it has the best flowers and foliage and it’s probably the one I see most commonly planted

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  6. great to see the aerial picture! you really live almost on the edge, stunning panorama. love the autumn colours too, didn’t realize it’s such a hotspot but will remember it. happy Easter 🙂

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    • Thanks Annette! Yes it’s prime autumn colour viewing country, here. In a few weeks, it will be jammed with people from Sydney taking pictures of trees (just like I did!) Happy Easter!

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  7. Beautiful colors, the season really is moving along isn’t it. Interesting that the color traces out the settled areas of town and that the native bush keeps its green color. I wouldn’t have noticed had you not mentioned it. Plus I would have been too distracted by the wonder of that aerial shot! What a landscape!
    Congrats on the 100th post 🙂

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    • It’s a bit of Australian thing, I think – no matter where you are on the continent, you can spot ‘civilization’ by the ornamental trees standing out against the olive green of the native eucalypts – it’s almost akin to a desert oasis 🙂

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  8. congrats on 100th post + to think you are in FAll as we are in Spring-neat to watch how your fall fills in-lovely shots 🙂 Thank you for the tour!
    I hate the powerlines….I wish ours were under ground, but that is what we have in our urban area and too often they are down when the ice/snow/wind disturbs them! The always hack ours to “ugly” too!

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    • Underground power lines are only in new estates in Australia, we are fairly backward in that regard, so basically every street has multiple tree murders running down one side!

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