Spring Snowstorm and Snowball Tree

I imagine most people don’t think of heavy snow when they picture Australia in the middle of spring, but last night, as a massive storm swept across the Sydney area, we had some of our heaviest snow of the season :-/

A news summary can be found on this link (ABC news) or just some pictures here (The Sydney Morning Herald)

Given that the storm was mostly a rain event, the snow was all but washed away within a few hours, and with the temperature remaining above freezing even while it snowed, it was mild enough to build a snow-man (taken with a cell-phone – sorry about the quality).

IMG_0361

October snow-man

And this is after temperatures on the weekend in the 20°’s (mid 70°F)!

Thankfully the rain washed the snow away fairly quickly: with all of the trees and shrubs in leaf and blossom at the moment 20cm of heavy, wet snow would have caused a lot of limb damage had it remained overnight. Gardeners a higher up than me will not be so lucky 😦

However, yesterday before the storm, I took some photos of areas in the garden in bloom. October is mostly the month that shrubby plants start to shine, and they certainly brighten the garden.

IMG_0595

Azalea brightens the fence

IMG_0605

Delicate White and Pink Cultivar

IMG_0603

Two-tone Pink

I’m only guessing at the cultivars, but I think the first is ‘Splendor’, the second is ‘Gyokushin’ and the third is ‘Splendens Pink’

In another corner of the garden that I still haven’t even got around to clearing yet (I’m only a quarter the way through the yard yet), wisteria has come into bloom:

IMG_0599

Wisteria

There are some nice plants in this area and I have taken cuttings of all the ones I want to keep, but mostly the wisteria is just covering a lot of weeds and lanky shrubs that need clearing….I had to angle myself behind a shrub to get the most flattering shot – from any other angle it just looks like a mass of overgrown weeds!

Lastly, and quite aptly, the ‘Snow-Ball’ (Viburnum opulus) tree has just started to bloom along the dividing fence.

IMG_0601

Viburnum opulus

The Fatsia japonica belongs to next door, but I think the comparison and contrast between it and the Viburnum is especially nice!

Happy gardening wherever you are! 🙂

Advertisements

6 thoughts on “Spring Snowstorm and Snowball Tree

  1. Mother nature is always the boss and always in control! All those three are the Indica types. I love them anywhere, but in this climate, as well as the main explosion of colour in spring, they spot flower all year and they grow beautifully in full sun/afternoon sun which makes them very useful indeed. Back in Sydney (I imagine its the same in the US South where they originate) the combination of sun and heat means they need shelter from about midday….at any rate, I’ve quite a few more in pots ready to add to the garden 🙂

    Like

  2. Wow snow!
    And how great to be restoring a property. My last house was like that but it was too much for me working full time as well with two children but one day I would like to have another go

    Like

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s