This week in the garden

As September draws to an end, the weather is certainly warming. Days are no longer single digits but in the mid teens (≈ 60°F) and the midday sun has a real warmth to it: while all of the bulbs are still going strong, the garden is now starting to wear the more vibrant colours associated with the middle of the season.

Of course there are still subtleties:

anemone

Woodland Anemone – Anemone nemorosa

These are all along the shady side garden….but I have to be quick to catch a photo – they close their petals the minute the sun disappears. They are not a particularly common flower here in Australia, but these appear to have naturalised in this part of the garden. I think they are especially charming. I overplanted this area with Tiarellas and the combination of foliage will be especially pleasing when they start establish.

Ones that I did plant nearby are a half-a-dozen English Primroses. This little cultivar is called ‘High Tea Drumcliff’. The seed packet promised white flowers on chocolate-green leaves. I guess, like the ‘Blue Admiral’ Rhododendron, that this might be overly-creative marketing?

P_Vulgaris

Primula vulgaris

Still, I like the pink and yellow. The colour palette is remarkably similar to the clump of freesias which are still powering along:

freesia

If only this were “smell-o-blog” – the scent is amazing!

As the days and nights are warmer, the scent fills this corner of the garden.

But now, to the bolder colours of spring. Here are two of the perennial wallflowers, which do quite well in my Zone 8 garden, despite having acidic soils:

Fragrant_sunshine

Erysimum ‘Fragrant Sunshine’

bowles_mauve

Erysimum ‘Bowles Mauve’

The Iceland poppies have finally decided to open, after displaying their furry buds since July:

iceland_poppy

1st Iceland Poppy

The Diascia, which I have in sheltered rockery facing due north has started the first of what should be a display until April. Here in my garden this is a perennial that can survive the winter as long as it has some sort of protection/radiant warmth:

Diascia

Diascia ‘Coral Belle’

Next up a Camellia japonica that was already here when I bought the property. I’m pretty sure this on is called ‘Hino-Maru’ but please correct me if I’m wrong 🙂 At any rate the single red petals and yellow stamens are particularly eye-catching:

Hino_Maru

C. japonica ‘Hino-Maru’?

And lastly, the Karume Azalea that was liberated from under the tangle of Ivy and Jasmine is such a saturated, intense punch of colour on a sunny day that my camera lens, and my eyes, find it difficult to adjust!

azalea

I really need shades…..

Happy Gardening 🙂

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6 thoughts on “This week in the garden

    • Thanks! I agree, Camellias are such a favourite in the temperate garden. I have planted another dozen or so, but as I’m largely using tubestock, it will be a case of ‘blink and you’ll miss it’ for the next year or so 🙂

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  1. It’s nice to see the first signs of spring (as we see the first signs of autumn). In my Irish garden we had a huge carpet of Anemone nemorosa, what a sight! It’ll be a while until I can look upon a similar thing in my new garden. Wallflowers are another favourite of mine especially Bowles Mauve.

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    • Thanks Annette…..I put these in as tiny little tube-stock (plugs) at the end of last summer; given I have acidic soils – much better for growing blueberries and azaleas than wallflowers – I wasn’t too sure how they would fare, but they seem to be doing very well which is fantastic. I do love wallflowers, such an underused little plant in Australia. The Anemone will probably need another year of two to do their best – that area was all grass (mostly couch) when I moved in; given how similar couch and Anemone nemorosa rhizomes look when you’re digging through grass, I’m sure many met their end in the compost heap 🙂

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